New Data Shed Light on Women's Internet Usage

Quick Roundup of Findings on Timeshare Stats, Marketing Messages, More

By Published on . 3

Nielsen put out a study this week showing increasing timeshare for social networks growing 43% to 22.7% of time spent on the web. Two recent reports shed some light on what women are doing online. Here's a quick roundup of the findings:

Yahoo partnered with research firm Added Value to survey 3,000 women in the U.S. Last week it released the results of the study, called "Women Connectonomics," which examines how and why women are using various websites. According to the study:

  • The most important needs for women revolve around personal growth, as well as their interdependencies on others in their social circle.
  • 44% of women say they get information about products and brands on women's lifestyle sites.
  • Women's lifestyle and special-interest sites fulfill the most needs for women. They also offer anonymity -- unlike Facebook and Twitter -- which can result in deep emotional connections for women. The study says women felt these sites offer users access to like-minded women and solutions to problems without the risk of being judged by people they know.
  • Women are most receptive to marketing messages on lifestyle, specialty and review sites. The study says these channels deliver three times the impact on purchase decisions in comparison to the other online sites observed.

ComScore also recently released a report, albeit with a more global focus, called "Women on the Web, How Women are Shaping the Internet." Among the key findings on social networking:

  • Social-networking sites reach a higher percentage of women than men globally, with 75.8% of women online visiting a social-networking site in May 2010 vs. 69.7% of men.
  • Globally, women account for 47.9% of total unique visitors to the social-networking category, but they consume 57% of pages and account for nearly 57% of total minutes spent on these sites.
  • Women spend more time on social-networking sites than men on a global basis, with women averaging five-and-a-half hours per month compared to men's four hours.
  • In the U.S., women buy online more than men, with 12.5% of female internet users making an online purchase in February 2010, compared to 9.3% of men.

For more women, see Ad Age's White paper "The reality of the Working Woman"

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