Goals for New York

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New York City's first chief marketing officer, Joseph Perello, 36, brought to the job nearly 10 years' experience in marketing at credit-card issuer MBNA and almost three years as VP-business development for the New York Yankees. He talked to Advertising Age`s Lisa Sanders about his mission and goals.

AA: What is your mandate?

Mr. Perello: We have three primary goals: Generate revenue without raising taxes; support city agencies and critical city initiatives; and promote New York City around the world for the growth of jobs and tourism.

AA: What do you want from potential partners?

Mr. Perello: Great brands. The city is looking for fees in return for real value for marketing. In a creative and relevant way, corporate partners will support city agencies. For instance, Snapple [which last fall inked a controversial deal with the city to be the exclusive vendor of water and juice drinks in city schools and also to put vending machines in city buildings] cares about nutrition and athleticism. ... And finally, the city asks a partner to integrate New York City and the idea of New York City into their [advertising]-similar to the way Visa promotes its relationship to the NFL or MasterCard promotes its relationship with baseball. In the sponsorship business we call it activation.

AA: Most CMOs have a budget. What is yours? I've read $2.6 million.

Mr. Perello: Yes, but it goes up all the time because we are making more money. As we do more deals, we bring in more money. We get zero money from the city.

AA: Have you set a number of deals you want to do?

Mr. Perello: Ultimately we want to do 10 or 12 partnerships.

AA: What categories are you interested in?

Mr. Perello: We have a competition under way among four overnight-delivery carriers. ... Other categories we're looking at are online and wireless.

AA: There was talk of naming subway stations. Is that ongoing?

Mr. Perello: Naming rights are not a critical element of how we are going to generate revenue. ... We'd do it only if it was relevant and made total sense for the city.

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