72andSunny Picks Up Google Chrome Assignment

A Look Back At The Brand's Recent Messaging Via BBH

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72andSunny can now add Google Chrome to its assignment list. The agency is currently working on a campaign for the browser, according to executives familiar with the matter.

Until now, much of the brand's messaging has come out of Publicis' Groupe's BBH, including the celebrated "Dear Sophie" [below] and "The Web is What you Make of it Campaign."

Both BBH and 72andSunny, recently named Ad Age's 2013 Agency of the Year, declined to comment.

Google has traditionally worked with a number of shops on a project basis, including Mullen, which has created work for the Nexus tablet, as well as Johannes Leonardo, which was behind the recent "Project Re:Brief" effort that updated classic ad slogans for the digital space.

According to Kantar Media, Google spent $72.2 million on measured media for Chrome between January and November of last year.

It should be noted that BBH has also lost some key creative talent that was working on the Google account. In late 2010, BBH Exec Director-Innovation and BBH Labs Founding Partner Ben Malbon, who had helped to cultivate the relationship between the two companies, left to join Google Creative Lab. He is now managing director there. Calle Sjoenell, the former deputy chief creative at BBH who steered much of the agency's Google work, left in 2012 to head creative at Ogilvy New York.

More recently, Jesse Juriga, the BBH New York creative who Ad Age named as one of 2012's "Creatives You Should Know," also left to become creative director at Google.

Earlier this month, Sony PlayStation announced it would shift its creative account to BBH New York.

Over the past few years, the Chrome campaign was centered the theme "The Web is What You Make of It," emotional appeals that went beyond the software to explaining the things you could do with the browser. There was the tear-jerking "Dear Sophie," the spot about a new dad and his attempts to chronicle the life of his newborn baby girl, using Google products.

The agency continued that theme with plenty of other well-received spots, like "Jess Time" [shown below] and "Coffee," dealing with a father trying to stay in touch with his college-bound daughter, and a man trying to get his ex-girlfriend back, respectively.

Notably, the agency's other offices across the world adapted the campaign's theme to make it more local. For example, BBH Asia Pacific produced "Soi Dogs," showing how one woman used the browser's functions to help abandoned stray dogs -- a big problem in Thailand.

In India, a beautiful film used elements of Tanjore, a South Indian style of painting using panels and jewels, to show how an artist in India became a successful online entrepreneur.

There were also a series of "Speed Tests," developed in partnership with Google Creative Lab, which showed just how fast the browser was using some decidedly analog methods. The agency pit a potato, sound waves and lightning against Chrome Beta, and captured the test using high-speed cameras.

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