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Arnold Worldwide Names Icaro Doria U.S. Chief Creative Officer

By Published on .

Icaro Doria
Icaro Doria

Arnold Worldwide has named Icaro Doria its U.S. chief creative officer, filling a leadership post that had been vacant since former Global Chief Creative Officer Jim Elliot departed the agency in March. Doria is currently chief creative officer of DDB New York.

Doria, whose appointment is effective in early September, will steer Arnold's output across its Boston and New York offices.

The seasoned ad vet began his career in his native Brazil before moving to the States in 2005. His first U.S. stop was as creative director at Saatchi & Saatchi New York, where he became the industry's most-awarded copywriter of 2007, according to Ad Age's annual Awards Report. From there, he ascended the creative ranks at Y&R and then Goodby, Silverstein & Partners before he returned to Brazil to open the Sao Paulo office of Wieden & Kennedy. There, he led Coca-Cola's 2014 World Cup push -- the brand's biggest marketing campaign to date a the time -- as well as efforts for Heineken, Nike, Philips and Mondelez.

DDB pulled him back to New York to take the office's chief creative post in 2015. In his time in that role, he was involved in setting up the New York branch of Omnicom digital shop Red Urban, which serves Heineken U.S.A. clients. He also oversaw notable work for Time Warner Cable, the AARP and the Wildlife Conservation Film Festival, including the film festival's animated tale showing endangered animals singing iconic Broadway tune "I Dreamed a Dream" fron "Les Miserables."

Arnold Global CEO Pam Hamlin said Doria, whom she called not just a creative leader but a "creative business leader," brings a welcome international perspective. "As the world gets smaller, having a global view is incredibly valuable and an experience very few creatives leaders have," she said.

For his part, Doria said he'd also been an avid observer of U.S. culture since he was an exchange student as a teenager and spent time in Harvey, North Dakota. Working at Arnold gives him the opportunity to touch ubiquitous, cultural brands including Progressive (and its famed spokesperson Flo), Hershey's, Jack Daniels and CenturyLink, he added.

"I want the agency to be more 'Boston,'" he added. "Arnold seems shy right now, and you don't go to Boston and come back thinking the people are shy. I want work from Arnold to reflect the personality of the city, even the work coming from New York."

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