DYSON SELECTS BARTLE BOGLE HEGARTY FOR AD WORK

Beat Out Goodby Silverstein & Partners

By Published on .

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Dyson, the British upstart that has left its vacuum cleaner rivals in the dust since entering the U.S. market three years ago, has chosen Bartle Bogle Hegarty, New York, to handle creative responsibilities on its U.S. advertising account, according to executives familiar with the matter.
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Calls to the Publicis-backed agency were not returned. Dyson did not return calls at press time.

Split with Fallon
Dyson, which launched its sleekly designed, high-technology vacuums in the U.S. in August 2002, split with its creative agency of record, Publicis Groupe's Fallon, Minneapolis, in June in what was described by the agency and client as a "mutually agreed" upon parting. At the time, Dyson said it was looking for an agency to develop new creative roots.

According to TNS Media Intelligence, Dyson spent $47.2 million in measured media in 2004 and $14.4 million in 2003.

In the review’s final stage, Bartle Bogle vied with Omnicom’s Goodby Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco, according to executives familiar with the matter.

MediaCom remains ad buyer
The review for a U.S. creative shop to handle a print and TV campaign was conducted by Dyson's in-house marketing team. WPP Group's MediaCom remains its media-buying agency in the U.S. Dyson's advertising in Europe is handled by independent VCCP, London.

Fallon had the U.S. assignment since 2002, and its TV and print campaign began in October 2003. The TV effort centered on the company's founder, engineer James Dyson, who in the ads discussed his frustration with traditional vacuums that become clogged and lose suction over time. In the most recent executions, Mr. Dyson performed only voice-overs.

For the 12 months ended in May, Dyson held a leading 20.3% share of the category, according to NPD Group. The company is currently embroiled in legal battles revolving with two main rivals, Oreck and Hoover, over ad claims, particularly Dyson's claim that its vacuums don't lose suction.

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