OFF THE MAP

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Despite unfavorable economic conditions and the desire, brought on by the terrorist attacks, to cocoon, Americans are still expected to spend an estimated $373 billion on food away from home this year — on everything from candy bars in vending machines to six-course meals at five-star restaurants. In fact, by year's end, the restaurant industry will have increased sales by an estimated 3.9 percent over 2001.* The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that in 2000 (the latest year for which detailed consumer data is available), the typical American household spent $2,137 (41 percent of the annual food budget) on food consumed away from home. Households headed by someone between 45 and 54 years of age spend the most on dining out — $2,638 on average — while the young (under age 25) spend the greatest share of their food budget (49 percent) away from home. Interestingly, young adults are as familiar with the kitchens of American restaurants as they are with the dining rooms. Of the nation's 8.1 million employees at restaurants and bars, 45 percent are under the age of 25, reports the BLS. Free food and tips — not bad for a first job.

*National Restaurant Association

OUT ON THE TOWN

New York City may be known as the country's restaurant capital, but Springfield, Mass. has one restaurant for every 78 residents.

RANK METRO AREA PERSONS PER RESTAURANT
1 Springfield, MA 78
2 Myrtle Beach, SC 250
3 Barnstable-Yarmouth, MA 295
4 Atlantic City-Cape May, NJ 300
5 Pittsfield, MA 305
60 Boston-Worchester, MA 511
157 New York, NY 586
160 Philadelphia, PA 587
174 Chicago, IL 602
242 LA-Long Beach, CA 674
Source: Easi Analytic Software, Inc.

CHECK, PLEASE!

Projected food and drink sales for 2002 (in billions) for the following types of food industry vendors:

Full-service restaurants $146.7
Fast-food restaurants $115.2
Managed services* $26.8
Lodging (hotels, motels, etc.) $18.6
Snack and nonalcoholic beverage bars $14.9
Bars and taverns $13.3
*Includes office cafeterias, hospitals, schools, etc.
Source: National Restaurant Association

CAFÉ CULTURE

Americans spend only 2 percent of their away- from-home food budget at cafés and bars, compared with Spaniards, who devote 40 percent.

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL CONSUMERS' AWAY-FROM-HOME FOOD

BUDGET DEVOTED TO THE FOLLOWING VENDOR TYPES, BY COUNTRY:*

FULL-SERVICE FAST FOOD CAFÉS/BARS
Mexico 83% 13% 4%
Argentina 77% 21% 2%
Japan 63% 14% 23%
Italy 60% 18% 23%
Brazil 55% 28% 17%
Germany 48% 43% 9%
United States 47% 50% 2%
Spain 47% 13% 40%
United Kingdom 27% 41% 32%
*Due to rounding, numbers may not add to 100.
Source: Euromonitor, 2002

THE LUNCH CROWD

Americans most likely to eat lunch in a sit-down restaurant, by demographic:

INDEX*
College educated 120
Individuals earning $75,000 or more annually 115
Adults age 65 and older 114
Women 109
Midwesterners 107
Asians 106
*The national average is 100. For example, Americans with a college degree are 20 percent more likely than the average American to eat lunch at a sit-down restaurant.
Source: Mediamark Research, Inc., 2001

BIG CUP

Metros ranked by residents' propensity to eat at a coffeehouse:

INDEX*
San Francisco 237
Seattle 199
Sacramento 183
San Diego 160
Los Angeles 160
*The national average is 100. For example, San Francisco residents are 137 percent more likely to eat at a coffee shop than the average American.
Source: Scarborough Research
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