Web sites worth the click

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At the click of a mouse, visitors to FirstGov.gov have access to every online resource offered by the U.S. Government, and can be linked to all state and local regimes. Search more than 27 million government Web pages for information ranging from science and technology to business and the economy. A special feature, Facts For You, contains federal statistics, reports, and data by subject, including agriculture and food, public safety and justice, environment and energy, travel and transportation, and health, among others. Want to know how many U.S. homes have four or more bedrooms? Or where alfalfa is grown in the U.S.? Click on this site to learn these answers and much more.


The Web site of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons provides the latest data and research on orthopaedics. Looking for medical stats? Check out the Research Facts section, where you'll find detailed information such as the percentage of cases involving knee injuries or the average age of a patient getting a hip replacement. The site also provides news updates, articles, and event listings in addition to links to other medical information sites, medical journals, medical associations and universities, and orthopaedic specialty societies.


The Internet Scout Project provides daily and weekly updates about valuable Web resources. The Scout Report, one of the Internet's oldest and most respected publications, provides a fast, convenient way to stay on top of new and newly discovered resources worldwide. Other Scout reports cover the specific areas of business and economics, science and engineering, and social sciences and humanities. The Scout Report for Social Sciences & Humanities, for instance, contains the latest population estimates, projections, and other key indicators for all geographic areas with populations of 150,000 or more, and all members of the United Nations. Other goodies for researchers and educators: Web sites, news items, search engines, online reports, online library catalogs, online books, and even Census data.

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