BtoB

B-to-b marketers carve out time for 'The Week'

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When The Week was launched in the U.S. in 2001, George Janson, managing partner and director of print media at mediaedge:cia, was less than enthusiastic. "I thought it was a dumb proposition: Take a newsweekly that worked in London and try to market it in the States?" he said.

Five years later, Janson has changed his tune. "I was a naysayer when the brand was launched," he said. "But numbers don't lie in terms of circulation growth."

The Week, which is owned by Dennis Publishing, raised its U.S. circulation rate base to 400,000 this year, up from 300,000 in 2005. Ad revenue increased 62% in 2005, while ad pages rose 9%, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. In the first quarter of this year, revenue rose 23%, while ad pages declined 7%. The Week limits ad pages to just 35% of the book, compared with a 45% or 50% ad ratio for most newsweeklies.

In 2003, The Week entered a partnership with the Conference Board, a nonprofit research organization that caters to C-level executives at more than 2,000 companies in 60 countries. The joint venture includes supplying The Week to 25,000 members of the Conference Board, cross-selling ads in The Week and Across the Board (the Conference Board's bimonthly magazine) and periodic breakfast forums with CEOs on subjects ranging from "The Genius of Innovation" to "Buyout Fever."

"This is a completely different concept that's fulfilling the information needs of this very difficult to reach market," said Justin Smith, president of The Week , referring to the C-suite. "B-to-b marketers are reaching a highly concentrated level of C-suite execs in a media property that's designed as an information tool for senior executives." Current b-to-b advertisers include Dell Computer, Exxon, General Electric Co. and Intel Corp.

UBS Investment Bank has been running ads in The Week for the past year and a half and has also been a sponsor of its CEO breakfast series. "It's a great way to associate ourselves with thought leadership events," said Jim Hummerstone, executive director of business marketing in the U.S. for UBS.

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