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BtoB's Best Creative: Sprint Business

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What better way to showcase a product than to put it to work in a day-in-the-life scene? That's the approach Sprint takes in "Claims Adjustor," a spot that demonstrates how its business products—specifically, its mobile broadband card—make just about any place a workplace.

The 30-second TV spot, created by Publicis & Hal Riney, is part of a campaign of case studies. Rather than focusing on a particular client, however, this spot demonstrates how Sprint's mobile broadband card helps the insurance industry. "The insurance industry was a very good example of how these products can impact a business and, in this case, an entire industry," said Doug Patterson, group creative director at Publicis & Hal Riney.

The spot depicts the aftermath of a fender bender, complete with tow truck, policeman and shattered glass. An insurance claims adjustor at the scene explains that people are always asking him when they can get their car back. The answer: "a lot faster with this mobile broadband card."

Proving the point, as he takes digital photos of the car and types away on a laptop, the claims adjuster explains how Sprint's mobile broadband card allows him to instantly access customer data and file claims, enabling him to handle more clients per day.

The client isn't concerned with the technology, though; he approaches the adjustor asking—you guessed it—when he can get his car back. Having finished the claim, the adjustor is about to answer the question when the client's car explodes into flames. The agent, unfazed, calmly reconnects the broadband card and opens his laptop, preparing to offer an updated answer based on the latest unfortunate event.

The straightforward spot gives viewers the facts but keeps the message memorable with the unexpected explosion, making the ad a winning combination of informative and entertaining. "Our goal was to tell a simple, meaningful story to our audience, and reward them for paying attention with an unexpected little thrill at the end," Patterson said. 

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