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Integrating e-mail with other marketing efforts

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If your e-mail marketing program isn't integrated with your other e-marketing activities, you're missing out from a branding perspective. But there's another benefit to integrated marketing, said Nick Stamoulis, president of Brick Marketing, a Medford, Mass.-based search engine firm: Building your e-mail list. “Your other marketing efforts should act as a partnership for your e-mail marketing,” he said. “The newsletter is a nice nurturing place. People coming in to your site through [search engine optimization], paid search or banners should always have the option of signing up for it.” Here are five ways to get your other e-marketing efforts to help build your e-mail list:

1) Create paid search terms based on your newsletter copy and title. E-mail is viral by nature. However, sometimes people may just forward a single story or piece of your original newsletter, which is why you need a way to let someone find you using search. You can also benefit from organic searches by properly designing the Web page your e-newsletter lives on, making sure it is optimized and linked to other pages on your site, Stamoulis said.

2) Put sign-up links on every page of your site. A properly optimized site, Stamoulis said, should be generating targeted visitors on every single Web page. This means it's not enough to put an opt-in link on your home page and main sections and leave it at that. “Visitors need to be able to sign up from wherever they find you,” he said.

3) Marry lead generation with list building. Your banner ad might be touting your latest white paper or webinar, but there's no reason that you can't use it to build your e-mail list, too. Make sure landing pages focus on the main call to action, but consider adding an opt-in, too. “On the download page you can also ask people if they would like to receive your weekly newsletter,” Stamoulis said. “Instead of just going for the kill and getting the lead, get it nurtured, too, since most buyers may be very early in the sales funnel when they download a white paper or click on an ad.” That said, don't make landing pages too busy or diversified. If the calls to action are all too large or there are too many, the prospect may think too much is going on and leave. “Try not to distract too much from the main conversation point,” Stamoulis said.

4) Remember your alternate URLs. Today you may use a separate URL for your CEO's blog and another for your community site. Both sites are perfect for list building since, if someone is there, they are probably looking to be more engaged with your brand, Stamoulis said.

5) Promote the e-newsletter within social marketing. Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter can be used to publicize your new e-mail newsletter. Excerpt headlines and stories, and use status updates to post links to your Web-based version where people can read and opt in. “The reality is if you keep the post informational and help leads do their jobs, you're providing something very valuable,” Stamoulis said.

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