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Microsoft unifies marketing messages

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Mike Delman
Title:
General manager-advertising and events
Company: Microsoft Corp.
Years in current job: 5
Quote: “Over the next year, we will continue to focus on maintaining a longer term approach to our advertising strategy as well as on simplifying the myriad of Microsoft messages to our core targets.”


Mike Delman, general manager of advertising and events at Microsoft Corp., had a goal for 2004: Keep it simple.

That's a big challenge for a company as large and diverse as Microsoft, which had a reported 2003 b-to-b ad budget of $253.0 million, according to the BtoB Top Advertisers special report this year, with data compiled from TNS Media Intelligence/CMR.

"We are trying to do fewer things. We want to find the right level of coverage instead of doing fragmented, smaller things," Delman said. "Over the next year, we will continue to focus on maintaining a longer term approach to our advertising strategy as well as on simplifying the myriad of Microsoft messages to our core targets."

One of the key changes the company made this year was in its events strategy, which Delman oversees. Microsoft realigned its event strategy to focus on more targeted, higher-return events.

"We re-engineered the process in which we evaluate and execute on event participation," Delman said, pointing to more focus on proving ROI for events. "We also worked to better align and evolve our business and creative partnerships, to include a consolidation of CRM partners and an evolvement of the McCann-IPG relationship."

This year, Microsoft consolidated all its CRM work with MRM, the relationship marketing agency of McCann Erickson Worldgroup, and with Wunderman.

Its most notable campaign was "Realizing Potential," a corporate branding campaign developed by Microsoft's ad agency McCann-Erickson, San Francisco.

The campaign, which included TV, print, outdoor, online, direct marketing, events and PR, shows how Microsoft helps people realize their potential, and it is designed to shift perceptions about the company, Delman said. "It was the broadest overall corporate campaign that the company has ever launched," he said, pointing to the rollout of the campaign in 29 countries.

Microsoft also launched b-to-b campaigns this year for Office, Windows Client and Windows Server.

Delman joined Microsoft in 1990 as director of corporate communications. He also served as director of the end-user customer unit for Microsoft Europe and general manager of the Microsoft Network. Prior to joining Microsoft, Delman was VP-management supervisor at Ogilvy & Mather.

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