Mindwave Research readies study of IT decision-makers

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Mindwave Research is taking direct aim at syndicate research stalwart Millward Brown IntelliQuest in the IT publishing field.

The company is launching a new survey of business technology buyers that it says will offer media buyers and planners a more complete view of how IT publishers reach their target audience. This month, the research company will assemble an advisory forum to help design questions for the Technology Advertising Planner (TAP), and plans to release the results in July 2005, in time for the fall media planning period.

Jonathan Hilland, president-CEO of Mindwave, said his study will be different from CIMS, the similar syndicated research offerings from IntelliQuest, in several ways. For starters, the TAP study, which will be conducted entirely online, promises at least 10,000 interviews of technology-buying decision-makers and will not include those who only influence decisions. The CIMS study does not distinguish between the two.

"If you're Intel or Microsoft trying to touch everyone on the planet with your message, the influencers are important," Hilland said. "But there's a need to have a study that helps [smaller] advertisers quickly get to the decision-maker."

The Mindwave study will ask respondents about the IT publications they read, technology trade shows they attend, Web sites they visit and e-mail newsletters they read.

Incorporating data such as a publication's Web audience into the readership surveys provides a single view of magazines' market penetration via different media, information that is offered separately by existing studies. "This will allow us to do reach-and-frequency measures against cross media, including online," said Merri Lee Barton, CEO of Barton Media, a media planning agency. "Right now we can't do that."

The study will include respondents working in channel distribution, as well as voice and data service providers. "We heard from advertisers that they want to see a measure of the channel publications and purchaser segments, like people who work in voice or data service provider areas," Hilland said. "They want to know what these people are reading and what sites they're visiting. The current studies generally observe the general IT and networking people, not these other aspects of the market."

The TAP business study will also provide psychographic data, such as attitudes toward brands and business values, which will help advertisers best speak to their audience, Hilland said.

Mindwave will be hosting events across the country in November to explain the study to interested subscribers. Pricing for subscriptions to the study will be adjusted based on variables such as size of publications and publishing companies, agency size and ad budget. Early subscribers and those who purchase more than one year's data will get a discounted rate. M

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