BtoB

Opt-in voice messaging service streamlines marketing campaign

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Challenge: Metis/America Marketing had to deliver big results, tackling clients such as the NFL. So when its voice messaging strategy fell short of expectations earlier this year, the company needed to find help elsewhere, without interrupting the rest of its marketing program for a wholesale client that sold high-end kitchen, bath, lighting and other fixtures.

Metis needed a more targeted strategy that reached out to architects, interior designers, builders and others to alert them of new store openings. The goal was to generate qualified b-to-b foot traffic at new stores, said Teresa Caviness, president of Metis, a full-service direct marketing agency with b-to-b and b-to-c clients. Metis works from companies in every sector, from financial services to retail to manufacturing.

Solution: Metis scrapped the phone service it had been using and signed up for Vontoo’s services after a successful trial period. Not only was Vontoo more cost-effective but the transition “was absolutely seamless,” Caviness said.

The Web-based voice messaging company boasts a usable interface that removes much of the technological stress from clients so they can focus on designing and implementing voice messaging campaigns.

“Basically as long as you have names and phone numbers of people you want to contact, you can get started in minutes,” said Dustin Sapp, president of Vontoo.

Changing messages is as easy as a making a recording on a phone, even down to customizing individuals’ names. The system can automatically place calls based on triggers such as packages being shipped.

Targeted, permission-based leads drive the philosophy of the service: Each client is required to verify that call recipients have expressed interest in receiving communication about a specific product or service.

Results: Vontoo provided all metrics online, including answer rates, how long recipients listened to messages, whether they responded to calls to action and whether listeners selected to opt out—all in real time.

“I’ve been very impressed with the reporting,” Caviness said. “We do think it’s a very effective tool.”

Confidentiality agreements prohibit Metis from discussing sales figures, she said.

Metis continued to use Vontoo’s services beyond the job it was initially hired for: After a testing period, the company used phone messages to alert the same audiences about upcoming trade shows and encourage attendance.

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