BtoB

Special Report: Frannie Jaye Danzinger

By Published on .

Most Popular

Frannie Jaye Danzinger enjoys flying solo in the media buying space. After spending six years with Cleveland-based Wyse Advertising Inc., Danzinger in 1997 launched her own agency, ProMedia L.L.C., also based in Cleveland, where she is president and media director. She said her desire to create media plans soup to nuts convinced her to strike out on her own.

"When you work for an agency, there’s never a beginning, middle or an end to projects," Danzinger said. "Working for myself, there’s always an end to the campaign, so I look forward to taking the client through the entire media process."

Just four years out of the gate, ProMedia has garnered an impressive roster of b-to-b clients, including Duke Energy Corp., HSR Business to Business Inc., Little Giant Pump Co. and Omnova Solutions Inc. Danzinger said providing added value is the key to her advertising strategy—regardless of the budget size. "Before I start with any client, it’s who, what, where, when, why and how," Danzinger said. "It’s not just about the sales reps trying to sell the lowest rate possible."

For example, when Danzinger landed the advertising account for Little Giant Pump in 1998, the pond supply firm’s $150,000 annual ad budget was buying a page here and there in vertical titles, such as Water Gardening and Pond Keeper as well as Better Homes & Gardens Special Interest Publications. Danzinger helped the company spread its wings by persuading executives to expand their message in the marketplace via direct mail and a heavier presence at trade shows in the home and garden arena. She said the campaign led Little Giant Pump to expand its product lines and double its advertising budget within the last few years.

She had a similar recipe when she started working on the Agilera Inc. account in 2000. The application service provider firm had a $5 million budget, and was targeting major trade and consumer titles such as CIO, Business Week, Forbes and The Wall Street Journal. Danzinger had Agilera continue marketing in print products, but also recommended the company branch out to events marketing, including the NFL Golf Classic last summer in conjunction with HSR B2B.

Moreover, she devised a 16-page pullout poster for Agilera, using heavy paper stock, that was inserted into Business Week. "It was an unusual creative for b-to-b advertising," Danzinger said. "Consumer ideas are coming into play with more and more b-to-b advertising. Agilera showed it was a risk-taker by thinking outside of the box."

Although Agilera has dialed back its ad budget because of the downturn in the tech sector, Danzinger’s efforts helped the company build a brand name prior to the crash.

—M.S.

In this article: