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Special Report: BtoB's annual Top 25 E-Champions: Harvey Seegers

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Ask many dot-com executives to forecast their companies’ 2001 earnings prospects, and they're likely to scurry back to their foxholes. GE Global eXchange Services President- CEO Harvey Seegers, however, fittingly responds like a true veteran of the b-to-b wars.

"I'm looking at exiting the year with 40% growth over fourth quarter 2000," said Seegers, who before joining General Electric Co. in 1991 spent 12 years in the U.S. Marine Corps, first in the South Pacific and later as an aide-de-camp to the commandant of the Corps. Seegers was twice decorated, once with the Meritorious Service Medal, which is awarded to those who distinguish themselves in commendable noncombat service to the U.S.



Name: Harvey Seegers
Title: President-CEO
Company: GE Global eXchange Services, Gaithersburg, Md.
Mission: "I'm looking at exiting the year with 40% growth over fourth quarter 2000."

Seegers can't rely on a medal to impress the e-commerce world. If the last few months are any indication, he and GXS are well on their way to doing so. Barely a year old, the GE unit has become one of the top developers of b-to-b e-com-merce networks, and a real competitor to IBM Global Services. Indeed, some 1 billion transactions worth $1 trillion in goods have already passed through GXS' platforms.

While GE's cash and connections have done much to smooth its way, Seegers has emerged as one of the b-to-b industry's most persuasive deal-makers, striking broad-ranging partnerships and development pacts with companies including PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P., Cap Gemini Ernst & Young U.S. L.L.C., Cargill Inc. and VisionAir Inc. The PWC and Cap Gemini deals in particular were coups for Seegers, for they give GXS a de facto marketing network of tens of thousands of consultants.

What is apparent is that Seegers' gung-ho ethos has done a good deal to bring GXS to prominence. It's less certain whether it will be enough to meet his goals in an increasingly fickle market.
— Philip B. Clark

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