Thomson Reuters targets traders with consumer strategy

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Objective: Thomson Reuters, an information provider to businesses and professionals, wanted to increase top-of-mind awareness and sales opportunities for its new financial desktop platform, Eikon. Strategy: The company launched a comprehensive global advertising campaign targeting senior traders at investment banks. Results: Traffic to the campaign website was triple what had been expected; Thomson Reuters hosted more than 2,300 clients at launch events around the globe, and entries to its South Pole competition number almost 5,000. Thomson Reuters provides information to professionals in the financial, legal, tax and accounting, healthcare and science, and media markets. Last June, the company launched a comprehensive global advertising campaign to generate awareness and leads for its new Eikon financial desktop platform. The integrated campaign—featuring the tagline, “New era. New tools.”—included print, digital, broadcast and out-of-home advertising in cities around the world, focusing heavily on New York, Frankfurt, London and Tokyo. Thomson Reuters' goals in launching the campaign weren't unusual: engage and excite its sales force, redefine market perception of the company and create opportunities for the target audience to experience Eikon, said Lee Ann Daly, exec VP-CMO, Thomson Reuters Markets. But the way the company went about reaching its target audience of senior traders at investment banks was a bit unexpected. It took a page from the consumer marketing playbook, Daly said. “We understood that with experience comes understanding, so we created as many touch points as possible, including launch events, street team activity and interactive displays in 14 cities around the world,” she said. “This was unlike anything we'd ever done as a company, and it really set us apart from our competitors.” Senior traders can be a difficult audience to reach digitally because many companies in the banking and finance sector block various websites during work hours, said Matt Broom, director of global strategic partnerships at Doremus New York, which handled media for the campaign (Gardner Nelson+Partners, New York, handled creative, and Jack Morton Worldwide, London, handled events and experiential marketing). So Doremus mapped the target audience's media consumption throughout the day, analyzing data such as search volume and social footprint. “The whole campaign was built around a lot of research into a day in the life of these traders,” he said. ”We wanted to understand where they "live, and what platforms they operate on.” Social media, including Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, was an important part of the campaign. “We did a lot of influencer analysis, which really drove a fairly dynamic social media strategy around listening, talking and giving,” Broom said. Surprisingly, Facebook was the most successful social site in terms of generating Eikon beta trials, Broom said. “The conversion rate that was generated through Facebook was pretty staggering,” he said. Experiential and out-of-home marketing also played a significant role in reaching the target audience. For example, street teams giving product demonstrations canvassed the area surrounding the Canary Wharf tube station in London, which has the heaviest foot traffic of financial professionals of any commuter station in the world, Broom said. The campaign also included a competition with a top prize of a trip to the South Pole. The campaign surpassed its goals from beginning to end, Daly said. “Traffic to the campaign website tripled expectations; our global media coverage has been outstanding; we hosted more than 2,300 clients at launch events around the world; entries to our South Pole competition number nearly 5,000; and our sales team has had nothing but positive feedback from current and potential clients,” she said. “In addition, the campaign's direct engagement with end-users has allowed us to gauge reactions and garner feedback in real time, which will contribute to the continued development and improvement of Eikon.”
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