Xerox focuses on services, consulting

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Diane McGarry
VP-chief marketing officer
Company: Xerox Corp.
Years in current job: 3 (as CMO)
Quote: “What we’re trying to do is amplify a few other things that we’re extremely good at.”

Two years after repositioning the company's image, Xerox Corp. capped its efforts in September by altering its logo and dropping the 10-year-old "The document company" tagline.

The change recognized that Xerox's efforts to sell itself as a services and consulting business were gaining traction. But CMO Diane McGarry has no plans to radically alter course. Rather, the education process will continue as Xerox builds awareness of its capabilities.

"The power of telling that message over and over again really resonates," McGarry said. "A campaign only becomes resilient after people have seen it for a long time. You really have to have your message hit home."

Customer testimonials, a cornerstone of Xerox's print advertising since 2002, continued to play an important role this year as the corporation touted not only document management but technology and consulting services as well.

But in addition to the likes of customers such as Honeywell, Siemens and Continental Airlines, McGarry was intent this year on reaching out to small and midsized companies through a marketing program that would place the corporate name in unlikely, surprising places.

Earlier this year, the company and Entrepreneur Magazine sponsored an office makeover contest for the most obsolete office; the event received more than 450 qualified entries and more than 200 mentions in print and broadcast outlets for its participation. A six-page spread on the contest will run in Entrepreneur's November issue.

In October, Xerox helped launch a national invention competition for children that should receive 10,000 entries, linking the Xerox name to innovation, and not just with children but with their parents. It also began, under McGarry's direction, to license the Xerox brand for such peripherals as digital projectors, desktop document or photo scanners and flat-panel monitors.

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