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The GIF is Dead; Get in Touch After You Die; Microsoft's Real-Time Translation Service and More

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The GIF is Dead. Here's Proof.

While the Oxford American Dictionary may have named "GIF" its word of the year, the Atlantic's Zachary Seward isn't convinced. Here, he offers proof that the format is actually on its way out.





Real Time Translation, Courtesy Microsoft

Microsoft is demonstrating a new technology that will be able to translate other languages into English in the same voice -- a boon for international event and conference organizers everywhere. The technique that powers the project is called "Deep Neural Networks," which signals that the future is finally here, according to The Next Web.




Stay in Touch, Even After Death

Fast Company reports that Tom Jackson, a 47-year-old Canadian businessman, has launched NowSayIt.com, a service that enables you to stop emails, videos and messages in case you suddenly die, and are left with no time to say all the things you may want to say. A step up from apps like If I Die, NowSayIt relies on subscriptions, and lets people appoint trustees to release the material after their death.




Obama and Big Data: What We Know

While Time Magazine already told us about how data informed so much of the President's re-election campaign, ProPublica does some digging to find out exactly what the scientists in the campaign did the oodles of big data it was unearthing.




We Know What You Look Like

In Japan, retailers -- and others -- will soon be able to identify customers' shopping habits using a facial recognition system powered by NEC, says Engadget. The $880 per month service will lets retailers profile customers with a video camera, to find things like age and frequency of shopping.




The Drama Backstage

Aaron Sorkin's upcoming film about Steve Jobs will basically be three 30-minute scenes set backstage, before key Apple product launches. That's it. It sounds about as tantalizing as, um, waiting backstage at an event, but TechCrunch points out that considering how it has been reported that Jobs was at his peak during those times, it might actually make for good viewing.

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