Google's Digital Ad Calculator; The Perfect Baseball Swing & More

Published on .

Google's Digital Ad Calculator

Google has launched a new suite of tools designed to quantify the value of mobile advertising. "Full Value of Mobile" is a digital calculator that is aimed at convincing marketers that digital is in fact a good advertising channel, and is an effort to get beyond the poor analytics that have made it difficult to discern mobile ad effectiveness, reports AdAge. Mullen, which was the creative agency on the project, concepted the site experience and created video vignettes that demo the tool.





Kids and Technology: Good or Bad?

New parents, get scared. The Atlantic has a long, in-depth feature about touchscreens and your toddler that is sure to make you question your parenting abilities more than you already do. What do smartphones, iPads, Kindles and their ilk do, exactly, to the cognitive development of children? The very face of American childhood is changing -- and simply keeping your kids away from screens might not be the best approach.





The Best Facebook Page Posts

The One Club has launched Newsfeeder, a tool that lets creatives search through a database of curated Facebook posts by brands, to highlight the best in brand creativity that is out there on the social web. The site, which is created in partnership with Facebook Studio, gets creatives like R/GA's Nick Law and Droga5's Ted Royer to curate and comment on the best work being shared on the largest social platform.





The Perfect Swing

Mashable reports that the University of Michigan has been workign on a new technology that combines physics with real-time data to help a coach figure out how his player can hit the ball out of the park. The device looks at the motion of a bat as you swing, to measure speed, control and reaction time, and use that data to determine the perfect swing.





Meet Ivan Ivanovich

Why did the Soviets beat the United States to space? Thank the oddly-named Ivan Ivanovich, a bright-orange jumpsuit-wearing doll who was actually the first person in space, beating Yuri Gagarin by a whole four weeks. The space-travelling doll, who is now in the Smithsonian, is, according to The Atlantic, a relic of times when speace was something to be feared. With skin of leather and a detachable head, Ivan was designed with the help of the Moscow Institute of Prosthetics, with a face that included eyelashes.

Most Popular