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What's Part Frappuccino and Part Cherry Pie? It's at Starbucks in Japan

By Published on .

It's a pie-beverage hybrid: the American Cherry Pie Frappuccino
It's a pie-beverage hybrid: the American Cherry Pie Frappuccino Credit: Starbucks Japan
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Starbucks is introducing a frappuccino you can attack with a fork. The American Cherry Pie Frappuccino comes with a crispy pie crust over the top of the cup. Sadly, this little slice of Americana is available only in Japan.

The beverage-dessert hybrid costs about $5.70 and includes whipped cream, a vanilla flavored base, pie chunks and a compote of American cherries. It's available in Japan from April 13 to May 16.

Starbucks Japan got a touch poetic in its news release: "Imagine that you're at a diner somewhere in America, and crunching with a fork a big American cherry pie served with ice cream on the side, a scene you could find often in foreign movies." In the U.S., meanwhile, Starbucks' new drink is a toasted coconut cold brew – iced coffee with coconut milk.

The past few months have brought a few intriguing food-and-beverage products from Japan, probably the world capital of flavor innovation. Kit-Kat, known in Japan for its wild flavors and varieties, put out limited editions that looked like sushi.

Coca-Cola developed an innovation for Japan called Coca-Cola Plus, a soft drink containing five grams of indigestible dextrin, a source of dietary fiber. It's targeted at people aged 40 and up.

Coca-Cola says that last year it launched 100 products in Japan, ranging from complete innovations to new takes on past offerings. It's a market where consumers are always looking for something different. Khalil Younes, executive VP-marketing and new businesses at Coca-Cola Japan, said in a company post in February: "It's not acceptable in Japan to have a product that doesn't evolve and get more perfect."