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Normies Rejoice: Alex Jones Now Sells a Red Pill to Help Your Brain Work Better

By Published on .

Conspiracy theorist and radio host Alex Jones has long hawked questionable vitamins and other products on his alt-right website, infowars.com. But now, Jones, whose website's tagline is, "There's a war on your mind!" has gone full-blown, off-the-wall "Matrix."

For most of us normies the idea of a "red pill" conjurs visions of Sudafed. But Jones' alpha fans know what the real red pill is -- and now they can take one for real.

Jones, who has said that the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, 9/11 attacks and Oklahoma City bombing were government plots (well, the government faked the moon landing, so staged domestic mass murder isn't a stretch) is now promoting The Real Red Pill, a dietary supplement he claims will make your brain work better.

It is, of course, a pointed reference to the cult movie—Jones loves a good Matrix reference—and its red pill/blue pill: "You take the blue pill, the story ends. You wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill, you stay in wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes." The idea being the so-called alt-right has cornered the market on truth and reality.

The Real Red Pill from the Infowars store costs $39.95 for a 60-day supply (a supposed 50 percent introductory savings!). It claims to support "hormonal balance" and "healthy aging" -- two things Jones himself would love nothing more than to be the poster boy for.

Online sales of vitamins and supplements surged 20 percent in the past year to $2.4 billion annually, Tabs Analytics reported in July, led by Walmart. Tabs research also shows that supplement sales "skew right wing" in a statistically meaningful way, though it's unclear why.

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