Oakley Unveils Brand Push, Aiming to Rally People Around Obsessions

Brand's Network of Athletes at the Center of the Campaign

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Oakley's global network of athletes is at the heart of a new global brand push for the sports eyewear and apparel brand, themed "One Obsession," that aims to rally people around their passions, athletic or otherwise.

Oakley's attempt to connect athletes with consumers in a more meaningful way marks a new approach for the brand. "Our business has become much more complex and much more global," said David Adamson, senior VP-marketing.

"We're in a unique position to facilitate conversations among athletes -- professional and non-professionals -- in a way that is quite privileged," he added.

The company tapped Eleven as the lead creative agency for the campaign last year and tasked the shop with creating a "company-wide mantra around the brand," as Oakley CEO Colin Baden previously told Ad Age.

The result is "One Obsession," which pushes the hashtag "#LiveYours" to encourage consumers to engage with the brand. "It's really a call to action for people to live their obsession," said Mr. Adamson. "We're trying to create a platform for consumers and athletes to facilitate a conversation around that."

Oakley is kicking off the campaign tomorrow with a video called "One Obsession" that will run on its website as well as social and digital channels.

The one-minute version features skateboarder Eric Koston, baseball player Matt Kemp, cyclist Mark Cavendish, surfer Gabriel Medina and cricket player Virat Kohli as they share their passions, but alongside some non-professional athletes. Oakley will also run 15-second and 30-second cuts. The spot is meant to tease a series of vignettes that will roll out over the next year with athletes' personal stories of inspiration.

The same stars and others will appear in print ads for the brand.

Oakley's network of athletes will use the #LiveYours hashtag to show off their own activities and obsessions. Some fans who respond via social media will be rewarded with surprise experiences that will bring the digital connection Oakley aims to foster to the physical world, said Mr. Adamson, declining to elaborate.

Oakley may be thinking bigger, but its budget will be the same as in previous years. Mr. Adamson said there is no real incremental investment. Oakley spent $11.3 million on U.S. measured-media in 2013, according to Kantar Media.

The campaign -- spanning 22 countries -- also includes print, outdoor, retail activation, live events and a microsite.