See the Spot: Latest Dove Video Shows Every Girl Wants to Change Something

Controversy May Be Inevitable, But Pinterest's Positivity Attracts Unilever

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Dove is releasing the latest video in its long-running Campaign for Real Beauty today, this time focusing on the vast majority of girls who'd like to change one thing about their appearance.

And while the Unilever brand may court some of the same controversy that's greeted other recent videos, such as the "beauty patch" offering from last year or the "Choose Beautiful" ad earlier this year, the most recent video also directs viewers to a safer place -- Pinterest.

Still, if there's some controversy, it won't be a surprise to Jennifer Bremner, senior brand development director of Dove. Part of the Dove Self-Esteem Project for girls first launched in 2004, the campaign "has always been focused on having the conversation, and I think sometimes you need different reactions in order to have that conversation," Ms. Bremner said.

At the same time, this year's video is linked to a new program on Pinterest that includes 80 "shareable resources" to help women address girls' biggest barriers to self-esteem, developed with Dove's global advisory board of educators.

Ms. Bremner acknowledged she likes the more positive and largely snark-free environment of Pinterest to house self-esteem materials. "Women go there for inspiration, to learn something and to do something," she said. "It was definitely the perfect platform for this type of activity."

Though WPP's Ogilvy & Mather has created most of the Campaign for Real Beauty videos, the latest comes from "creative content agency" Evidently, with VaynerMedia pitching in on other content and Edelman on PR.

The idea sprang from Dove research finding 90% of girls would like to change one thing about themselves, with the film showcasing a variety of girls wishing they had curly or straight hair, lighter or darker skin, were shorter or stronger, etc.

"We're hoping to inspire girls to realize they don't need to change themselves and help build a more positive relationship with their own beauty," Ms. Bremner said.