Taylor Swift Is Back for Diet Coke's New 'Taste' Campaign

Pop Star's Newest Ad for the Brand Is Coming This Fall

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Diet Coke -- which has been stuck in a sales rut -- is making a new taste appeal with three TV ads that include Taylor Swift, a crowded airplane and a carwash. The spots are part of a new campaign called "Get a Taste" that seeks to get attention by posing the question, "What if life tasted as good as Diet Coke?"

In the first spot, called "Economy Class," a woman stuck on a crowded overnight flight takes a sip of Diet Coke, prompting a party. The ad (above) will debut during Wednesday's season premiere of "Nashville" on ABC.

A second spot, dubbed "Carwash," will begin airing in early October and showcase an everyday industrial carwash that is transformed into a "lively, Gatsby-style party," according to the brand. A third TV spot will feature Taylor Swift, who first began partnering with Diet Coke last year.

The ads are by Droga5, which last year replaced Wieden & Kennedy as Diet Coke's agency-of-record.

The campaign will also include digital video, print, radio and out-of-home advertising. A spokewoman did not disclose spending totals but said the effort "represents a significant boost in marketing support for the brand." Last year, Coca-Cola spent $26.1 million in measured media on Diet Coke, according to Kantar Media.

"Through the 'Get A Taste' campaign, we're reminding fans why they fell in love with Diet Coke the first time, and we're inviting everyone to experience the magic behind the taste of Diet Coke," Andrew McMillin, VP-Coca-Cola Brands, North America, said in a statement.

The campaign comes as Coca-Cola seeks new momentum for Diet Coke, the nation's No. 2 soda, whose volume declined by 6.8% last year, according to Beverage Digest. Diet Pepsi, experienced a similar decline.

Ms. Swift appeared in a Diet Coke ad earlier this year called "You're On."

The brand used the same tagline in outdoor ads that were mocked on the internet by some observers who noted that the line could be viewed as a drug reference.

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