This is your third of seven free items this month.

To register, get added benefits and unlimited access to articles, Become a Member. Already a Member? Sign in.

JWT New York Parts Ways With Ryan Kutscher

Published on . 0

Less than a year after Ryan Kutscher was hired as co-chief creative officer of JWT's flagship New York office, he's now exited the agency.

Kutscher--whose experience with agencies include a lot of freelance work and a five year-stint creative director at CP&B--was brought on in May 2012 by JWT to serve in the role along with Matt McDonald, who had been an executive creative director at JWT, New York.

Ryan Kutscher
Ryan Kutscher Credit: Todd Selby
The departure is sudden and with little explanation. It's surprising too considering that Jeff Benjamin, JWT's chief creative officer for North America had worked with Kutscher at JWT and made the hire. In his time there Kutscher worked on Macy's and Litter Genie, among other things.

Kutscher couldn't immediately be reached for comment. JWT confirmed the departure but declined to comment further.

It's understood that now Benjamin and MacDonald will lead the creative department in New York.

The role of New York chief creative has seen a lot of churn at JWT over the past few years. Before the arrival of Kutscher and promotion of McDonald, Peter Nicholson was in the role for a short time. He was hired to fill a role left vacant by Ty Montague.

At the time of Kutscher's hire, we asked about the problems inherent in a co-CCO structure, but Mr. Benjamin insisted it would work. He said at the time: "There's a lot of surface area that needs to be covered. ... If it's just one person, you often times can't get the vision and leadership that you need. Nobody can be an expert in all of these things, so the best bet you can make is to put together a team. When it doesn't work, it's probably because of chemistry. I know that it's going to work because I've worked with Ryan before, have been working with Matt now, and we have got the [right] chemistry."

Now it seems like an experiment which simply didn't work.

Read These Next

Comments (0)