Creatives To Know 2010: Ant Keogh

Published on .

Most Popular

What is a weenis? It's not what you might think.

It's one of the many creations of Ant Keogh, whose multi-disciplined creative exploits spill over his actual title of executive creative director at Clemenger BBDO Melbourne. Keogh is perhaps best known for the Carlton Draught Made From Beer campaign, specifically, Big Ad, a big ad that was a piss take on big ads. The spot swept the awards shows a few years back and was named Ad of the Decade by Australian trade Campaign Brief.

Recently, Keogh masterminded the latest Carton Draught campaign, featuring a roving band of musicians singing of the physical cues that tell a man to get out of the office and go have a beer (like the aforementioned weenies, a part of your elbow). Keogh is listed as art director, executive creative director and copywriter on the campaign, and that's not even the half of it. He also wrote the music in the ads, performed the songs during the pitch to the client to sell the idea and played in some of the spots themselves.

He arrived at Clemenger three years ago via George Patterson Y&R and other agencies, but Keogh is, obviously, into all kinds of things while he's not in the office. Mainly, the married dad is visual artist, but he's also a musician, director, screenwriter and occasional fashion designer/entrepreneur through his art project-slash-mock corporation, Funkuncle.

"I could always draw well as a kid and that kind of sparked everything off, but I came from the kind of family that would have never understood me becoming an actual artist," says Keogh. "Consequently it didn't even occur to me until much later...When I went to design school I wanted to be an illustrator but a lecturer told me I wrote funny stuff and should look at advertising. I got a One Show book and learned from that. I think it was probably for the best because I would have gone crazy in a room on my own, illustrating."

Keogh says the idea for the latest campaign came from research on men unsatisfied with their working lives and says he wrote the ads' songs on his bed one morning. "After about an hour, the song kind of just came to me.; the idea of a leg telling a guy what to do.."

In this article: