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Six Things You Didn't Know About CP+B's Rob Reilly

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As Crispin, Porter & Bogusky celebrates its 25th birthday this month, here are some of the lesser known facts about its worldwide creative lead, Rob Reilly -- and some of his favorite work from the shop.

This is the latest in a new Creativity series about things you might not know about adland's creatives. See our first installment, featuring McCann's Linus Karlsson, here.

1. He is obsessed with chairs. Around his house, you'll find every corner filled with some type of chair. Why? He doesn't know, except that he started loving chairs when an old friend's furniture landed up in Mr. Reilly's New York studio. His favorite chair is Arne Jacobsen's 1958 "Swan Chair." In his house, however, the ratio remains even, with four chairs to each table. It's a wonder he wasn't the brains behind Facebook's first ad, which focused heavily on furniture.

2. One of his favorite spots from Crispin is one many people might not have seen. A Spike Jonze spot for GAP, it only played in movie theaters near stores that were being renovated.

3. The costume for the infamous Burger King "King" figure (see an ad starring the creepy mascot) was made out of carpet and drapery. The night before the shoot in New York, the King Head arrived. Made of fiberglass, it looked great, but the costume didn't. So the team went to ABC Carpet and Home and spent $5,000 on carpet, drapery and tassels to make the costume.

4. He plays in an "Over 40" soccer league in Boulder, Co. He started out as a striker, but "because the older you get, the further back on the pitch you end up playing," he now he stops goals. The last game his squad played lost 7-3. "Not surprising," he said. "Considering the level of play."

5. Back when he had "good hair," he played guitar and sang in a cover band in college. His band was called "The Difference."

6. If he wasn't in advertising, he would have ended up as a game show host, because, he says, some of the skills of a creative director are the same as a host -- keep the show moving, make it entertaining, and make sure someone wins. What show? "What's that Chair?" of course.

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