Creativity 50:
Richard Turley, Creative Director, Bloomberg Businessweek

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Print is not dead, at least in the case of Bloomberg Businessweek, which over the last two years has been the darling of the publishing design world. Richard Turley, 34, landed the role of creative director in 2010 after a long stint at The Guardian. The magazine's concept-driven covers have made a particularly big splash, featuring everything from a pair of humping planes to a chainsaw-wielding businessman. Here, Mr. Turley shares some of his favorites.




The idea for this came from a phone call with Brad Stone, the writer of the story. He was describing the way Twitter has been run and said, "It's almost as if this is a company is so inept that it couldn't even kill itself."














We use detournement quite a bit, which is a form of montage routed in the theory of "turning expressions of the capitalist system against itself." It feels appropriate here, with the IRS tax form underneath big, punchy type. Most of my work involves trying to turn the capitalist system against itself, but try not to tell anyone that.














I'm not a great fan of pastiche, but there was something nicely brazen about using the language of supermarket circulars to tell a story about the Obama campaign, which is often praised for the "taste" and "sophistication" of its design.














It's what I feel about the debt crisis, and being buried by the never-ending 24-hour-7-day doom vortex of pundits, bankers, politicians, everyone. It was also nice to be able to do something that wasn't a cover by any usual measure, that was a mutually understood moment between the magazine and the readers.














In some ways you are looking for efficiency—the simplest, quickest hit you can deliver. I think this does that quite well, with some guts and a little bit of bile. I have no time for the corrupt political apparatus of China, which makes this cover that much more rewarding, when your own politics are able to be woven into the work you do.

See the rest of the 2012 Creativity 50 here.

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