180's Adam Chasnow joins Crispin Porter + Bogusky

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Creative veteran Adam Chasnow, who last served as a CD at 180 Amsterdam, will be heading back to the States to join Crispin Porter + Bogusky's Boulder office as group creative director.

Chasnow spent five years at 180, where he led global work for Heineken's Amstel Beer and Motorola, along with European campaigns for HTC and GM's Opel. He also helped steer the team that earned 180 the business for Sony Electronics in the U.S., leading to the launch of 180LA.

Chasnow's previous haunts include Cliff Freeman & Partners, where he was VP/ACD. He also worked at Goodby, Siilverstein & Partners and early on, served as a copywriter at McCann-Erickson and DDB. Over the years he's received multiple awards for his work on clients like Amstel, Hollywood Video, Fox Sports and Church's Chicken, including One Show and Cannes Gold, ADC, D&AD and AICP honors.

"I am really excited about joining CP+B," Chasnow says. "I was looking to move back to the USA. But I wasn't in a rush. I wanted to make sure that when I left 180, an agency with a unique international perspective and an ambition to find ideas that cross borders, that I was going somewhere that also has a strong culture and philosophy. CP+B certainly has that. If you ask anyone who has worked with me, I have always been a big fan of Crispin. And over the last few years, I've found myself, as I know many of us do, citing their work and the way they solve problems, as we worked out our own briefs, reviewed work and talked with clients. And not only is their work interesting and provoking, the volume of it seems staggering to me."

"I've known Adam for 15 years and have been a fan of his work for a long time," says Crispin Partner/CCO Rob Reilly. "He is extremely intelligent. He is interested in ideas beyond tv. He is genuinely a nice guy. Three things that made our decision to work together easy."

As for what Chasnow's main charge will be, "we do not necessarily hire people for accounts," Reilly says. "But Adam has an insane knowledge of technology. In fact, he used to run a mobile phone company out of his apartment me in New York, back in the day—As a hobby. It's hard to find people as talented as Adam that also have a genuine love of techy stuff. We have a number of accounts in house that could benefit from his experience, as well as, a number of brands out there that we are talking to."

The return to Stateside life will pose some challenges for the new GCD. "Leaving Amsterdam is a hard one," Chasnow says. "It is a beautiful little city and a most unusual place. The lifestyle here is unlike anywhere in the world. The quality of life is high. And even when you're working a lot, it still feels like you're on vacation once you get on that bike and ride home."

But he returns with some lessons learned from 180 and Amsterdam culture. "At 180, there were people from 30 or so different countries, and more often than not, I was the only American in the room," he says. "You learn quickly that not everyone thinks like us and not everyone likes us the way we think they do, even now. But they do like our TV shows and are as up to date on Breaking Bad, Entourage, and Glee as anyone in Cleveland. (And they're not getting them from iTunes).

"Another thing I learned is patience. Because when you slap together some Finns, Swedes, Japanese, Portuguese and Aussies, you never know what you're going to get. A lot of stuff won't work. But when it does, it's usually pretty cool. And different. But coming up with ideas that can work across borders, and I mean across culturally different places, like, for example, Russia, Hungary and Greece, is not an easy task. I am definitely looking forward to tapping into the collective consciousness of Americans. We are way more alike than I thought.

Check out some of Chasnow's past work below.