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T-Mobile Reaches Past Snapchat Kids With 50% Off for Seniors

Published on .

Credit: istock, T-Mobile

T-Mobile U.S. has an offer for older mobile-phone users with no kids at home -- two lines and unlimited data for $60 a month.

The new plan, representing half off the standard price of $120 for two lines, starts Aug. 9 for consumers over age 55, T-Mobile said Monday in a statement. It includes fees and taxes.

Seniors represent a unique business opportunity for wireless companies because they use their phones less than younger subscribers and tend not to watch as much YouTube or upload video clips. Adding less-intensive customers would help T-Mobile boost subscribers without taxing its network as much.

"We've done extraordinarily well with millennials and with people in urban markets," said Andrew Sherrard, T-Mobile's chief commercial officer. "I hate using the term senior, but older people are a segment we don't do much business with today. And we think it's ignored by other carriers."

The age-specific offer shows wireless companies are eager find an edge in the hunt for new customers. T-Mobile continued to be the fastest-growing carrier last quarter, while AT&T and Verizon Communications both posted surprisingly big customer growth.

AT&T, Verizon and Consumer Cellular have senior plans that are priced based on the allocation of minutes. Consumer Cellular, for example, has prices starting at $15 for 250 minutes of calling, and $2.50 a month for 300 texts.

T-Mobile said new and existing customers are eligible for the $60 offer. Signups must be done in person with a photo ID at a T-Mobile store.

-- Bloomberg News

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