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Facebook warns Mexicans about fake news in presidential campaign

Published on .

Members of the National Union of Miners and supporters of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, presidential candidate of the National Regeneration Movement Party, shout slogans while Obrador officially registers his presidential candidacy on March 16.
Members of the National Union of Miners and supporters of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, presidential candidate of the National Regeneration Movement Party, shout slogans while Obrador officially registers his presidential candidacy on March 16. Credit: Yael Martinez/Bloomberg

After coming under fire for its role in the 2016 U.S. election, Facebook is taking steps to prevent what it calls fake news during Mexico's presidential campaign.

The social-networking giant on Tuesday placed full-page ads in prominent Mexican newspapers including El Financiero under the title "Tips to Detect Fake News." The company's logo appears on the top left corner.

After the election of President Donald Trump, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had to respond to critics who said that certain viral stories on the network, such as a false report saying that the pope had endorsed Trump, could have swayed the election.

The company has worked with First Draft, a nonprofit journalistic coalition, to come up with tips to detect misinformation.

In the newspaper ads on Tuesday, the company lists 10 tips, such as "Doubt the headline," "Check the source" and "Carefully observe the URL." At the bottom of the page, a banner reads, in Spanish, "Together, we can limit the diffusion of fake news."

Facebook didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about the ads.

Mexico votes for president July 1.

-- Bloomberg News

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