Google Snaps up RSS Ad Network Feedburner

Official News on the Deal Is Still a Week Away

By Published on .

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Google has acquired Feedburner, although the deal won't officially be announced for another week, according to a person familiar with the deal.
Feedburner currently manages 721,000 RSS feeds from 423,000 publishers, including many major mainstream news publications, including USA Today, Dow Jones and Reuters.
Feedburner currently manages 721,000 RSS feeds from 423,000 publishers, including many major mainstream news publications, including USA Today, Dow Jones and Reuters.

Launched in '03
Chicago-based Feedburner launched in 2003 as a news-feed management system and has since launched an RSS advertising network. Users of RSS -- short for really simple syndication -- subscribe to feeds that then automatically deliver new blog posts, news stories or podcasts when they are published.

Such tools have led to incredibly fragmented audiences. Instead of people having to go to one destination site for their news, they can have the content delivered to them.

Feedburner aggregates all of those content feeds into marketer-friendly channels, which advertisers can buy. It can target by geography, daypart and can cap frequency of ads.

More data for Google
For Google, the acquisition has the potential to deliver an interesting new set of subscription data to its already robust search data. Feedburner currently manages 721,000 feeds from 423,000 publishers, including many major mainstream news publications, including USA Today, Dow Jones and Reuters.

The blog TechCrunch, which in an earlier post confirmed the acquisition, valued the acquisition at $100 million.

Feedburner did not return request for comment. A Google spokeswoman said, "We do not comment on market rumor or speculation."

One of Feedburner's more interesting advertiser applications is its recently launched AdClimate tool, which identifies brand-safe places for advertisers to run. AdClimate scans RSS feeds and blog posts for keywords that an advertiser wants to avoid -- advertisers check the words that are off limits and Feedburner suppresses the ads in those instances.
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