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Out of Print: A Look Back at Iconic Village Voice Covers

By Published on .

The Village Voice was never afraid to wear its heart on its cover.
The Village Voice was never afraid to wear its heart on its cover. Credit: Village Voice

Yuppies, bankers, vampire politicians, Republicans, and any number of New York poseurs can sleep a little easier tonight. The Village Voice is ending its print run.

The progressive free weekly has been a dying a medium for years, strangled by Craigslist and put out of its misery by Google, Facebook and, well, internet porn. But this feels like a final blow: Now even the Voice -- an icon of New York culture -- has been silenced on sidewalks.

The historic alt-weekly pioneer has been a free fixture in New York media since 1955 (though it wasn't always free), co-founded by Norman Mailer, Ed Rancher and Dan Wolf. It was home to journalists like Jack Newfield, Nat Hentoff, Tom Robbins, Ken Auletta and too many to name.

The Village Voice front pages were themselves works of art. To look back through them is to take a trip through history. The paper helped a traumatized city pull through September 11 and documented a hometown-boy-made-bad with the election of Donald Trump.

In its earlier more raucus days, the newspaper treated the city's elite, Yuppies of the 1980s, like an oddity, an invasive species come to ruin New York. One Voice investigation dived into their "feeding habits." The story isn't online, but we're pretty sure there's no small amount of Bolivian marching powder on the list.

More serious covers took on the second Bush administration, with a vampire President George W. Bush sucking the blood from the Statue of Liberty.

Here is a look at a few memorable covers through the years:

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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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Photo credit: Village Voice.
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