Mark Zuckerberg Reveals Plans for AI-Powered T-Shirt Guns

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Mark Zuckerberg is trying to arm the machines … with T-shirt guns.

That's right; his vision for the future of artificial intelligence includes a cannon that shoots him his wardrobe. On Monday, Mr. Zuckerberg wrote about an AI project he worked on all year in his home, an effort to connect his house to a virtual assistant.

Mark Zuckerberg's plain wardrobe could make it easier for AI to help him dress.
Mark Zuckerberg's plain wardrobe could make it easier for AI to help him dress. Credit: Facebook

One of his more unique ideas appears to be able to remotely control a T-shirt cannon that could fire gray shirts his way upon command.

Mr. Zuckerberg is known for his Spartan wardrobe, wearing the same gray T-shirt and hooded sweatshirt every day, presumably making it easier to get robotic help dressing in the morning.

The T-shirt gun is "the best home appliance," Mr. Zuckerberg said, commenting on his own Facebook post, adding that he would share videos of his AI efforts on Tuesday.

The Facebook CEO outlined all the ways he was trying to tap into AI in the home. Mr. Zuckerberg has said he wants a personal assistant similar to Jarvis from the movie "Iron Man."

Mr. Zuckerberg programmed his assistant for more than shooting T-shirts, which apparently was tougher than expected -- it's unclear if it worked and how exactly.

Facebook declined to comment further.

He also connected his lights, music, front door and other home controls, which can be accessed by voice and text commands.

The project could ultimately help Mr. Zuckerberg understand how AI will impact the future, its possibilities and limitations.

One helpful insight was the fact that it felt more natural to text the machine than to speak to it in most cases.

"One thing that surprised me about my communication with Jarvis is that when I have the choice of either speaking or texting, I text much more than I would have expected," Mr. Zuckerberg wrote. "This is for a number of reasons, but mostly it feels less disturbing to people around me."

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