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Tremor Video Hires Meredith Vet Lauren Wiener as First President

The Company Has Raised $116 Million, But Video Not Growing as Fast as Expected

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Video ad network Tremor Video has hired Lauren Wiener as the company's first president in a bid to help it grab bigger deals from major advertisers.

Lauren Wiener
Lauren Wiener

Ms. Wiener, who will oversee all sales and marketing, has spent the last nine years at Meredith Corporation, where she was most recently senior VP in charge of Meredith 's digital operations.

Tremor CEO Bill Day said Ms. Wiener will help build on "great million-dollar relationships and take them to the next level."

"I'm a big believer in digital, but I also say TV and print people have more experience than digital people do in managing those larger client relationships," he added. "The fact that she has bridged traditional and digital so successfully is important."

Ms. Wiener said she was attracted by the opportunity to join one of the biggest startups in the online-video space.

The company has raised $116 million to date, but Mr. Day hinted that online-video spending has not increased as quickly as the company has expected. He said he believes online video is currently experiencing a "digestion period," as advertisers and agencies are figuring out the best way to measure online-video campaigns and related returns on investment.

Mr. Day said the company will do more than $100 million in revenue this year, and that revenue is up 30% year-over-year. He declined to comment on profitability. Tremor has the vast majority of the $37 million it raised last year in the bank, Mr. Day said, as it looks for more acquisition targets. He said the company has looked at about 25 possible acquisitions in the last year and that he's spending about 20% of his time evaluating acquisition targets.

Separately, the company's chief media officer Jason Krebs will be leaving at year's end to do something new, which may include launching a startup, he told Ad Age in an email. He is not being replaced; instead, his direct reports are being reassigned to other senior managers.

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