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YouTube Boots Logan Paul From Google Preferred

By Published on .

Logan Paul will not appear in Season Four of 'Foursome' on YouTube Red.
Logan Paul will not appear in Season Four of 'Foursome' on YouTube Red. Credit: AwesomenessTV via YouTube

YouTube's premium ad program is no longer part of the "Logang," as fans of Logan Paul are sometimes called.

The video platform has kicked Paul out of Google Preferred, after he filmed a dead body in a forest known for suicides in Japan and posted it to YouTube on Dec. 31. Preferred is meant to ensure brands run their ads alongside quality content.

Ads will still be served on Paul's content through the YouTube Partner Program.

"In light of recent events, we have decided to remove Logan Paul's channels from Google Preferred," a YouTube spokeswoman said in an email statement. "Additionally, we will not feature Logan in season four of 'Foursome' and his new Originals are on hold."

"Foursome" is a show produced by AwesomenessTV and is featured on YouTube Red, which is a subscription-based, ad-free video offering. Paul played a social media star in the scripted show.

YouTube would not comment beyond the official statement.

The move comes more than a week after the suicide video was posted, a time during which YouTube was criticized for only giving the channel a strike and issuing a statement expressing sympathy to the family. A strike is issued when reviewers are notified of a violation of the Community Guidelines, per YouTube.

The company has been trying to present a cleaner image with advertisers, who have grown concerned about the content posted by some of the video creators supported by ads. Paul was just the latest web personality perceived to go too far with videos.

Last year, Disney cut ties with Felix Kjellberg, aka PewDiePie, the most popular YouTuber with almost 60 million subscribers, after he posted a video in which he joked about anti-Semitism.

Brands are also worried about inadvertently supporting fringe videos from terrorists, extremists and other offensive content. YouTube has taken measures to give advertisers more controls over where ads run and what videos are allowed to show ads.

A number of YouTube creators have been hit with "demonetized" videos, meaning they can't show ads on certain content because they run afoul of standards.

But advertisers of late have also expressed concern about Preferred. YouTube has given assurances that the videos are of the highest quality, but is not always forthcoming about what's on offer in the program.

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