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Kraft chooses comScore to track shopping habits

Kraft Foods today selects comScore Networks to track and analyze consumers' online shopping habits. ComScore has a panel of 2 million people who've approved having their online behavior monitored in exchange for software to speed Internet downloads. ComScore will study users' online shopping behavior and how much Kraft.com influences their purchasing decisions.

Gian Fulgoni, chairman and formerly chairman-CEO of Information Resources Inc., said comScore also is developing relationships with companies that collect frequent-shopper card data from retail grocers. He said comScore intends to link the influence of online ads to the offline purchase behavior of its panel.

DoubleClick, Salesforce service woos publishers

Salesforce.com and DoubleClick announce a partnership today to offer a sales force automation service. It's intended to let Web publishers manage sales leads and customers and track the work of Web sales reps. Web ad network and ad-services venture DoubleClick will resell a customized salesforce.com service to customers of DART for Publishers, its service to manage and serve ads.

Snowball marketing unit studies young adults

Snowball, a network of young-adult Web sites, today opens IQuestics, a Norwalk, Conn.-based marketing research division. IQuestics will gather information on 13-to-30-year-olds for major marketers as well Snowball's partners and advertisers. IQuestics will use Web-based surveys, discussion boards, Internet polling and online focus groups.

AdRelevance launches revamped service

AdRelevance, a unit of Jupiter Media Metrix, today introduces the second generation of its Web ad-tracking and measurement service. A key feature will track Web ads using actual traffic; the automated system will monitor Web activity and make more frequent visits to sites where it spots heavy traffic, capturing ads served during the upswing. The service also will offer a prospecting tool with a database of media buyers for the top 5,000 Web advertisers.

Two radio companies ink ad-repping agreements RadioWave.com signed an agreement with rep company Interep Interactive, New York, to sell the streaming audio company's iSpot advertising. The division of Interep, a radio and Internet sales company, will help advertisers selectively purchase iSpots -- interactive and audio spots -- on RadioWave network sites. ISpots combine radio commercials and Internet banner ads. Users who hear the ad can respond immediately by connecting to the marketer's Web site.

In another deal, Citadel Communications Corp.'s Citadel Broadcasting Co. signed a deal with community site developer KOZ and Web rep company Real Media to develop sites and sell ads.

F.Y.I.

HomePortfolio.com today begins print ads in The Wall Street Journal and trade titles. Ideate, Watertown, Mass., did the ads. . . . I-shop Grafica, Chester, N.J., today unveils Grafica.eCRM Corp., which it calls a full-service enterprise customer relationship management ad agency. . . .Gil Marmol resigned as CEO of Luminant Worldwide Corp., the ailing i-shop roll-up backed by Young & Rubicam. President-Chief Operating Officer James Corey succeeded him. . . . Duncan Drechsel, director of marketing at BabyCenter, left last week to pursue consulting work. Shari Fujii, VP-marketing at BabyCenter, assumes his responsibilities. . . . MTVi, the online arm of Viacom's MTV Networks, last week cut 105 people and tabled initial public offering plans.

Chat. . .

Cereal killers: Snap popped. (Snap.com was folded into NBCi.com.) Pop snapped. (Steven Spielberg and cohorts pulled the plug on Pop.com.) Will crackle be next? Well, no, because there's nothing to crack. Telepathy, a Washington Web development outfit, registered crackle.com as a domain that might work for one of its sites, but wound up not using it. Crackle.com has been sitting dormant for more than two years, says Telepathy President Nat Cohen. "We aren't actively marketing crackle.com, but we would consider a proposal if one was made," he says. "We don't have a price in mind." He wondered only briefly whether the fates of snap.com and pop.com would have any bearing on the success of a site named crackle. "Snap.com wasn't snappy and Pop.com never popped," he says.

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