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Domino's Japan CEO Announces Plans to Open Outlet on Moon

Known for Wacky Stunts in Country, Pizza Maker Builds Elaborate Site to Explain $21B Space Project

By Published on . 6

Domino's Pizza in Japan plans to build the first fast-food outlet on the moon, revealed the pizza maker's president in Japan, Scott K. Oelkers. The affable Mr. Oelkers appears in a full spacesuit, customized with a Domino's patch, and displays a big picture of the Moon Branch Project he describes in an intro video on a dedicated site for the project.

Domino's Japan CEO Scott K. Oelkers
Domino's Japan CEO Scott K. Oelkers

The site outlines the stages of the ambitious program at great length, including an engineer's full- length presentation of the construction plan, an extensive Q&A session and a menu of the required funding, which will amount to about 1.6 trillion yen, or $21 billion, reports Ad Age 's Creativity . Mr. Oelkers speaks in English, with Japanese subtitles and a few words of Japanese at the end, but other parts of the site are in Japanese.

Domino's is known for its wacky marketing efforts in Japan, and the news spreads fast. The U.K.'s Daily Telegraph ran an oddly straightforward story today that starts "Domino's Pizza has announced plans to conquer the final frontier by opening the first pizza restaurant on the moon." The story is the most-read in the newspaper's science section and garnered lots of comments, ranging from people playing along and wondering about whether Domino's "free if not delivered within 30 minutes" rule will apply to orders placed on the moon to complaints about the publicity stunt.

Domino's stepped up the stunts last year to celebrate the company's 25th anniversary in Japan. The company offered an entertaining online "Pizza Tracking Show" that invited online pizza order placers to register to see the progress of their pizza in real time through the final step of delivery on a scooter, with some added bells and whistles.

That effort, by Japanese agency Asatsu-DK and local digital shop Bascule, won a bronze award at last year's One Show in New York.

In December, Domino's took applications with great fanfare for a part-time job for one lucky hire at the rate of 2.5 million yen, or $31,030, to deliver pizza. The job was only for a single hour, but applicants poured in. In another promotion, all babies born last year on Sept. 30 -- the exact date the first Domino's opened in Japan 25 years earlier -- are entitled to a free pizza on their birthday until they turn, of course, 25.

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