See Some of the Best Latin American Work Going to Cannes

Striking Creative Ideas Flourish in the Region

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Unusual creative ideas flourish in Latin America. They're often related to sports, from a beer bottle-opening tooth implant in Argentina to training soccer fans' moms to be the security guards at a violence-prone sports stadium in Brazil. Sometimes sophisticated new technology is developed, while other campaigns invent new media as simple as bedsheets hanging on terraces.

Ad Age's partner in Spanish-speaking Latin America, Adlatina, worked with us to gather some of the Latin American creative work that judges and festival goers will be looking at this coming week at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. (More than 40 campaigns, compiled by Adlatina in this year's edition of "Standouts," can be viewed here.

Here are a few of our favorites:

Ogilvy Argentina: Beer tooth implants
Ogilvy Argentina: Beer tooth implants

Rugby isn't for the squeamish, and neither is the "Beer Tooth Implant" campaign by Ogilvy & Mather Argentina. If a guy is going to play this tough sport, and get his teeth knocked out, why not replace them with better teeth that can also do important things like open beer bottles easily? Rugby sponsor Salta beer rewards players for their commitment by offering to replace those lost teeth, free of charge, with a unique dental implant developed with a team of orthodontists and industrial designers. The new tooth, as shown in a graphic video of the dental procedure, includes a tiny bottle-opener feature that lets rugby players be stars in bars as well as on the playing field. Although it just sounds like a ridiculous stunt, several rugby players really have these implants

Ogilvy Brazil: Security moms
Ogilvy Brazil: Security moms

In another sports-related effort, this time in Brazil, Ogilvy addressed the issue of violence at soccer games—this time among fans in the stands rather than on the field. A team in the city of Recife, Sport Clube do Recife, recruited and trained 30 moms of soccer fans to join the security team. The sight of the vigilant "Security Moms" caught everyone's attention and helped raise awareness of the issue, and the match that is usually the most violent of the soccer season was peaceful, with no arrests.

JWT Colombia: Bedsheet Billboards
JWT Colombia: Bedsheet Billboards

With "Bedsheet Billboards," J. Walter Thompson Colombia invented a new medium when one of Colombia's largest banks, Banco Caja Social, wanted to help low-income families who didn't have bank accounts learn how to save. The deal: Each family had to open a bank account, and they were paid, through that account, for the use of their terraces, easily viewed from the highway. On laundry days, they hung out to dry the attractive bedsheets provided by the bank that had a personalized message on one side relating to the family's savings goal, such as "We're saving at Banco Caja Social for Juan to go to college."

Coke Thirst: JWT Brazil
Coke Thirst: JWT Brazil

Coca-Cola, often at the forefront of innovative advertising, challenged J. Walter Thompson Brazil to somehow use sound to create a thirst for Coke—and to do it in movie theaters. The agency worked with sound experts Dolby to create a movie trailer powered by the sound of a Coca-Cola inside the iconic contour bottle. "Coke Thirst – A Sound Experience by Dolby" captures the sounds of fizz escaping as the bottle cap is popped, the pour, crackling ice, and the effervescence as the glass fills up. The accompanying images follow the cola's voyage from bottle to glass. The trailer was shown in 1,135 Brazilian cinemas, and the rest of Latin America will follow.

Leo Burnett Argentina: Safety Truck
Leo Burnett Argentina: Safety Truck

In another ingenious twist of technology, Samsung used its fleet of trucks circulating around Argentina to attack a deadly problem: 80% of the country's traffic accidents are caused by drivers attempting to pass other vehicles on narrow roads. Samsung incorporated its technology into trucks to make passing safer. A wireless camera in the front of the truck captures the view of the road ahead and projects it onto four monitors on the back of the truck that form a high-definition video wall, showing cars behind the truck exactly what lies ahead. Leo Burnett Argentina is the agency for "Safety Truck."

See all the campaigns on the "Standouts" site here.

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