Otto Fuerbringer, Former Time Editor, Dies at 97

What You Should Have Read, July 30, 2008

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Otto Fuerbringer, Former Time Editor, Dies at 97

The New York Times carries an obituary for Otto Fuerbringer, the hard-driving, conservative-leaning managing editor of Time magazine during the political and social upheavals of the 1960s, who died Monday at his retirement home in Fullerton, Calif. He was 97. With political inclinations attuned to those of Time's founder, Henry R. Luce, with whom he had a close working relationship, Mr. Fuerbringer was appointed to the magazine's top editorial position in 1960. During his tenure, Mr. Fuerbringer moved the weekly into new territory. Time's lead story on April 8, 1966, had no portrait on the cover, just a bold-red headline on a black background that asked, "Is God Dead?" It was one of a number of cover stories during Mr. Fuerbringer's tenure that took on volatile issues. In 1964, for example, the magazine examined the sexual revolution; in 1967, it was the birth control pill. In 1968, the last year of his editorship, when Mr. Fuerbringer wrote an article that said the Vietnam war could not be won. Time's circulation rose to five million from three million under his leadership. In 1968, a year after Mr. Luce's death, Henry A. Grunwald was appointed managing editor, the start of a shake-up at Time. Mr. Fuerbringer was named editor of magazine development for Time Inc. and went on to lead the team that created two of the company's most profitable publications, People and Money.
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