How to Text-Message Your 'Mob'

Media Morph: Mozes

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YORK, Pa. (AdAge.com) -- Every week Ad Age Digital's Media Morph looks at how emerging technology is changing the way consumers get their information and media companies and advertisers present their messages. This week: Mozes
Wholly Mozes: Plain White T's
Wholly Mozes: Plain White T's Credit: Frank Albertson

What it is: Text and ye shall receive. Mozes is an SMS self-service marketing platform by which anyone can create a marketing message, promotion or giveaway built around a keyword. When people text Mozes (66937) and type in that keyword, they will receive the text message you've designated. The collective group of texters is your "mob."

Cost: First keyword is free; additional words are $5 each a month.

Who's using it: So far, musical artists and their fans -- from established ones such as Hinder and 50 Cent to up-and-comers such as Boys Like Girls and Plain White T's -- who use their names as keywords to keep in touch with fans. Irv Remedios, Mozes' VP-products and marketing, wouldn't say how many users or bands have signed up, but said the numbers have almost doubled every month for the past three to six months. Mozes is testing marketing ideas with a handful of brands. Still unknown: whether consumers will accept SMS ads.

Biz model: Creating interactive, customized marketing campaigns is the main source of revenue. Mozes offers levels of service from small-band or self-managed-consumer messaging to more complex programs with multiple messages and keywords. There's also SMS revenue sharing from carriers, advertising on the website and possible mobile ads.

Why you should care: SMS marketing consists mostly of one-way input by consumers who vote or deliver opinions to marketers. A service like Mozes could allow marketers to create connections and databases of fans thanks to two-way information relay. "A lot of advertisers are trying to connect with the consumers who are using our application right now, mostly the 18- to 24-year-old college-age crowd," Mr. Remedios said. "The sweet spot is in how we transition from bands to brands."
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