MORE ADVERTISERS DRAWN TO 'REALITY' TV?

By Published on .

Most Popular
LOS ANGELES (AdAge.com) -- Edgy reality TV shows will be jamming up network schedules this fall, but not all were to the liking of
advertisers. Now Fox says some are becoming easier for advertisers to stomach.

Fox's highest-rated series last year, Temptation Island, scored well in its limited run -- but many advertisers stayed away due to its racy nature. That is the case with many shows of this type -- including NBC's current summer show Fear Factor. But now some of these shows have come more appealing to marketers.

An easier sell
"Temptation Island has become much easier to sell the second time around because advertisers have become more comfortable with it," said Sandy Grushow, chairman

Related Stories:

FOX REALITY SHOW CONTESTANT HAS ARREST HISTORY
Says Knife at Woman's Throat Was a Joke

REALITY SHOWS CHARGED WITH FAKING IT
Inside Edition Details Staged Scenes

REALITY SHOWS' NEW FRONTIER: SHAME
The Move Beyond Titillation and Greed to Humiliation

CONTESTANT ALLEGES RIGGED REALITY SHOW OUTCOME
Lawsuit Charges 'Demographic Fraud'

of Fox Television Entertainment Group, during the TV critics tour in Pasadena, Calif. "The sky is not going to fall."

Mr. Grushow also believes that advertisers came on board when they knew that Fox would be scheduling the show during the high-profile, highly competitive 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday night time period.

For the start of the season this fall, Fox will use Major League Baseball playoffs and World Series to promote the show and its other new programming for the fall.

'Real time' action series
One of Fox's biggest pushes will be with 24, an action series set in "real time," meaning each of 24 episodes follows one hour in a day of Kiefer Sutherland, who stars as a agent in an anti-terrorist unit looking to stop a assassination attempt on a presidental candidate.

Mr. Grushow said he'll be looking at ways to rerun certain shows perhaps within a week of their initial premiere on Fox-owned cable networks.

"Look at the way dramas are repeating in the summer -- it's frightening," Mr. Grushow said. "We have to make sense of our business. One of the ways is to offset costs by repurposing [shows]."

In this article: