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About that viral black BBQ, social media and the joy of memeing

By Published on .

Some stories are destined to live forever—and take on a whole new redemptive life of their own—with a little help from social media.

Case in point: The ascared white lady who recently called the cops on black people having a BBQ in an Oakland, California park. As a social media phenomenon, it started as a video, "White Woman Called Out for Racially Targeting Black Men Having BBQ in Oakland" (embedded above), originally posted by YouTube user Michelle Dione on April 29. As of this writing it's racked up more than 1.1 million views—but that number underplays the attention the incident got on YouTube, not to mention other platforms, with additional posts, remixes and cuts of the park drama popping up all over, including "White Woman Calls Police On Black Family's BBQ In Park" and "Oakland Woman call police on family for BBQ while black."

Add in some gradual news coverage such as "Family wants to create awareness after BBQ confrontation at Lake Merritt" from the Bay Area's KRON 4 News (May 9) and "Woman Calls Police on Black Family for BBQing at a Lake in Oakland" from HuffPost (May 11), plus some attention from high-profile aggregation sites (Reddit on May 10, Boing Boing on May 13), and you've got an angry white lady who was well on her way to internet infamy.

But then something amazing happening: The story became a meta-story with a BBQ sequel that inspired a whole new wave of social media obsession. Per The San Francisco Chronicle: "Oakland locals host massive party where woman called police on black men's barbecue," last Thursday.

What was the internet to do with that information? Double-down on ensuring that the angry white lady's fame didn't expire at a mere 15 minutes.

By Monday night, the memeification of the angry white lady had reached a fever pitch ...

... and then, serving as the perfect desert for the social feast, MonoNeon (aka Dywane Thomas Jr., a Memphis-born bassist known for his YouTube videos and session work with Prince, Ne-Yo and others) showed up last night with this:

What's the lesson here? As Instagram user swisschris777 put it (commenting on MonoNeon's handiwork):

People got camera, samples and musical instruments - you can still be fucking up - but you get exposed

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