CNBC Relaunches CNBC.com

Video-rich Site Replaces MSNMoney.com

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NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- Want to know what certain CEOs said about their earnings last quarter? Missed Jim Cramer and want to check out which stocks he tipped last night? CNBC is offering it all today, with a new financial website that replaces the lackluster offering at MSN Money.
The website should help CNBC improve measurement of its product. Nielsen Media Research does not measure out-of-home viewing, and many in CNBC's business audience watch from their offices or in bars and restaurants.
The website should help CNBC improve measurement of its product. Nielsen Media Research does not measure out-of-home viewing, and many in CNBC's business audience watch from their offices or in bars and restaurants.

CNBC.com will carry 15,000 clips in its archive and update its global news offering with reports from bureaus in Singapore and London. Video comes in three different forms: video-on-demand, live streaming and clips that pop up alongside charts and tools.

The launch of a comprehensive website with a robust video offering should help CNBC improve measurement of its product. Nielsen Media Research does not measure out-of-home viewing, and many in CNBC's business audience watch from their offices or in bars and restaurants.

Ad-supported video
The ad-supported video offering offers agencies two positions per page, along with pre-roll, which is being sold to advertisers. The site, however, will revert to a subscription offering when users try to access anything that's more than 24 hours old. The charter subscription price is $9.95 a month.

"We're doing 850 interviews a week around the world," CNBC CEO Mark Hoffman said. "We've hired a number of people for the website and 60 people who are fully integrated [between the site and the TV offering]."

Those who have joined the site include senior news editors Albert Bozzo, former executive producer of Forbes.com, and Scott Billings, who was news editor and producer of WSJ.com Video. CNBC's own Alex Crippen has been named executive producer of CNBC.com.

Blogs and message boards
In addition to video, each show from "Squawk Box" to "Power Lunch" to "Mad Money" has its own blog and message board. Industry-specific blogs cover automotives, pharma, real estate, technology, sports and media. Reporters will also update the content of TV segments in real time and provide additional charts and links.

Marketers signed up to support the launch include Fidelity Investments, E-Trade, Gorilla Trades and Ameritrade. "They're on for a fixed time period for December, and after Jan. 1, we will open it up," said Robert Foothorap, VP-CNBC global sales. "When it's established, we have every confidence we'll take it beyond endemic advertisers, just as we do on air. We provide pre-roll for 75 video clips daily and buttons, banners and everything else you find online."

The site is supplemented with wire reports from Reuters and stock charts users can manipulate. A ticker carries tailored stock prices with little camera symbols for those with accompanying video.

Breaking news
When asked where CNBC will break news first, online or on TV, Mr. Hoffman was hard-pressed to respond, saying that Jonathan Wald, senior VP in charge of business coverage, probably would say TV. Meanwhile, Meredith Stark, VP-web content, said the web would break news first. Mr. Hoffman said it would depend on the situation and might only be an occasional issue.

CNBC's history online has been long and varied. The website had a robust offering in the midst of the '90s dot-com boom, but when the market tanked in 2001, interest in stocks waned. Not long after, NBC licensed the brand name to Microsoft, which linked it to MSN Money. That deal expired during the second quarter of this year, and since then CNBC has been working on a complete overhaul of its offering, no doubt spurred by the likelihood of future competition from Fox News Channel's coming business service.
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