Nielsen: Number of TV Households up 1.3%

More Viewers Are Older, Which Means They'll Likely Watch More

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NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- More U.S. TV watchers are getting older, a condition that gives them more overall time for watching TV, according to Nielsen. The research firm estimates the number of U.S. TV households will total 112.8 million by Jan. 1, 2008, an increase of 1.3% since last year.
Nielsen's numbers show the large generation of baby boomers migrating into older demographic groups. One of the fastest-growing categories was persons between the ages of 55 and 64, a group that grew 3.9%.
Nielsen's numbers show the large generation of baby boomers migrating into older demographic groups. One of the fastest-growing categories was persons between the ages of 55 and 64, a group that grew 3.9%. Credit: Zuma Press

Migration
Nielsen's numbers show the large generation of baby boomers migrating into older demographic groups. One of the fastest-growing categories was persons between the ages of 55 and 64, a group that grew 3.9%. The number of young adults, however, grew by just 0.3% from last season.

Nielsen's estimates for U.S. TV households are used for the company's national TV ratings, and go into effect Aug. 27. They will be used for the entire 2007-08 TV season. With these new estimates, each household rating point will represent 1.13 million households and each rating point for persons aged two years or more will represent 2.86 million people.

Moving on up
Nielsen also has found that many of the increases for local TV markets are in the Southern and Western regions of the U.S., owing to population migrations to those areas. Of the 51 markets that moved up in rank, more than half are located in the Sunbelt, Nielsen said.

Dallas-Fort Worth moved up to the fifth designated market area, or DMA. Atlanta moved up to eighth. Phoenix moved up for the third year in a row, becoming 12th, while Charlotte moved up to become one of the top 25 markets, becoming 25th. Other notable upward movers were Palm Springs, Calif.; Austin, Texas; and Boise, Idaho.
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