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Note to Russia: Trump Might Need Your Help to Hack IQ Test Results

By Published on .

President Donald J. Trump at the NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, Sept. 2, 2017.
President Donald J. Trump at the NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, Sept. 2, 2017. Credit: Official White House Photo by Andrea Hanks

Today Forbes released a story by Randall Lane headlined "Inside Trump's Head: An Exclusive Interview With the President, and the Single Theory That Explains Everything." There's a lot to unpack in the piece, but one passage is getting all the attention because it neatly encapsulates Trump's penchant for using the media (even as he attacks the media) to wage battle with and undermine members of his own administration:

He counterpunches, in this case firing a shot at Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who reportedly called his boss a moron: "I think it's fake news, but if he did that, I guess we'll have to compare IQ tests. And I can tell you who is going to win."

Forbes is so happy about getting that soundbite that it's turned it into a Twitter graphic:

As for that "single theory" alluded to in the Forbes headline, well, here's a taste of it, per Lane:

Nearly a year after the most stunning Election Day in many decades, pundits still profess to find themselves continually shocked by President Trump. They shouldn't be: His worldview has been incredibly consistent. Rather than as an opportunity to turn ideology into policy, he views governing the way he does business—as an endless string of deals, to be won or lost, both at the negotiating table and in the court of public opinion. Look at his first year through this prism, and it makes sense. And it offers clues for the next three years—or seven.

Coninue reading.

Meanwhile, to circle back to IQ tests for a moment, well, I'll just leave this right here:

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