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How TV Shows Handled Las Vegas Massacre

By Published on .

As the nation tried to make sense of the Las Vegas massacre, TV networks scrambled to figure out whether and how their entertainment shows should address the devastation.

The CW and iHeartMedia put off airing the iHeartRadio Music Festival this week, which had taped in Vegas last month. "Out of respect to the victims of last Sunday's terrible tragedy in Las Vegas and their families, The CW Network and iHeartMedia will be postponing this week's TV broadcast of the iHeartRadio Music Festival. New broadcast dates will be announced at a later time," the network said in a network statement.

Some, including ABC's "Dancing With the Stars," took a moment of silence at the top of the program to pay tribute to the victims.

MTV aired an anti-gun ad during the return of "TRL" on Monday. "Take action: We all have the power to prevent gun violence," the PSA said, suggesting seven actions viewers could take.

The show, which is being revived on MTV after nearly a decade off the air, started with all of its hosts and guests addressing the devastation.

"For us, it hits especially hard because it took place at a concert packed with people of all ages, coming together to share a common bond: the love of music."

Jimmy Kimmel, who hails from Vegas, broke down as he addressed the shooting, which left 59 people dead and injured over 500. In his 10-minute monologue, Kimmel showed photos of over 50 senators who voted against closing loopholes on background checks following the shooting in an Orlando nightclub.

Of course, other late-night hosts spoke about the tragedy.

"I've been doing this job for more than 24 years, and when I began in 1993, occasions like this were extremely rare," Conan O'Brien said during his TBS show. "For me or any TV comedy host back then to come out and need to address a mass-shooting spree was practically unheard of."

And Trevor Noah's "Daily Show" on Comedy Central naturally weighed in. "Just to give you an idea of how far away America is from actual gun control, this week Congress is going to vote on deregulating gun silencers," Noah said. "Because I guess Congress is thinking gun violence is out of control. How can we make it quieter?"

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