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Vanity Fair Suggests That Hillary Clinton Take Up Knitting and the Twittersphere Is Not Happy About It

By Published on .

In attempt at producing a ... uh ... fun viral video, Vanity Fair's Hive blog released a one-minute short titled "Six New Year's Resolutions for Hillary Clinton" on Twitter—and the Twittersphere is not happy about it.

Originally published on Saturday, the video seemed to have largely fallen throught the cracks over the holiday weekend, but gained traction—and suddenly started attracting plenty of negative attention—on Tuesday as many office workers started heading back to their desks (and back on Twitter).

If you haven't yet watched the video above, watch it now—especially the part where one VF staffer suggests, "Take up a new hobby in the new year. Volunteer work, knitting, improv comedy—literally anything that'll keep you from running again."

Here's a small sampling of the reaction that Vanity Fair's attempt at comedy has unleashed on Twitter in the last 24 hours:

Notice the #CancelVanityFair hashtag? So did former Clinton advisor Peter Daou:

Another Clinton adviser, Adam Parkhomenko, had an idea for a new use for Vanity Fair:

The backlash doesn't seem to be dying down today; in fact, Vanity Fair is, as of this writing, a top 10 Twitter trending topic—and more and more tweeters are calling for the magazine to apologize.

Incidentally, compounding the awkwardness for Vanity Fair is the fact that its owner, Condé Nast, recently named Radhika Jones to succeed longtime editor-in-chief Graydon Carter. Jones was set to start her new job on Dec. 11, but she hasn't tweeted since landing the job in November.

UPDATE: Per the New York Post's Alexandra Steigrad,

According to VF, Jones did not have anything to do with the video—and neither did Carter. It was created during the transition period and it was under the direction of Jon Kelly, the Hive editor. The Vanity Fair spokeswoman said Kelly would not be making a statement, and instead offered a blanket apology: "It was an attempt at humor and we regret that it missed the mark."

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