AD AGE'S WORLD WIRE;MOTOROLA CHANGES MARKETING PLANS;FINNS RESTRICT ADS ON CHILDREN'S TV;MEAD JOHNSON LAUNCHES CALCIUM DRINK;EXEC INTERCEDES SMH RETURNS TO VOGUE;DIRECT MARKETERS WELCOME REGS;QANTAS TARGETS HIP JAPANESE TRAVELERS;LITHUANIA CRACKS DOWN ON TOBACCO ADVERTISING

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[budapest] Motorola aims to regain leadership of the Hungarian mobile phone handset market by shifting emphasis to its cheaper line of GSM mobile phones. Motorola led the market for two years after mobile telephony was introduced in Hungary. But shrinking demand for its bulky phones and tough competition in the GSM handset market put the company behind Nokia and Ericsson. Motorola plans to introduce up to seven new GSM models this year, following the trend towards cheaper, easier-to-use phones.

[helsinki] Finland's Court of Marketing Affairs has banned the screening of commercials between children's TV programs and after programs that last for less than 30 minutes. The ruling will have the heaviest impact on MTV3, Finland's only national commercial TV channel, which carries candy and toy ads during children's programming.

The court's decision follows a complaint by Finland's consumer ombudsman, who described MTV3's weekend cartoon programming as "too commercially orientated and against the best interests of young viewers." The ruling also will affect cable TV network PTV.

[toronto] Mead Johnson Ottawa has created a new segment in Canada and elsewhere by launching Calais, a fruit-flavored, clear sparkling beverage which contains as much calcium as a glass of milk. Calais has only six calories per bottle, vs. 129 calories for an 8-ounce glass of 2% milk. The launch is supported by a TV/radio/print ad campaign from Harrod & Mirlin Toronto.

[london] SMH (U.K.) has reinstated its advertising with Conde Nast's women's monthly Vogue after the intervention of Nicolas Hayek, chairman of parent SMH Co. of Biel, Switzerland. Giles Rees, manager of SMH's Omega brand in the U.K., had ordered the suspension of all ads in Vogue after being "appalled" by the "skeletal appearance" of some models in the June issue. He is believed to be concerned that young female readers may be encouraged to eat less and to develop the eating disorder anorexia.

In a letter to Vogue, Mr. Rees said that "largely as a result of our chairman Nicolas Hayek's belief" in editorial freedom, SMH's Omega has agreed to continue its advertising.

[toronto] Canada's direct marketers have endorsed a proposed law to require marketers and others to safeguard the personal information they gather.

[sydney] Qantas, Australia's international airline, is targeting young, hip Japanese in its latest campaign from M&C Saatchi-and there isn't a koala in sight.

Print ads in Japanese magazines promote stylized images of Australia's inner-city cafe society, shopping and night life. The ads feature a telephone number to order a booklet which asks: "Who said night life in Australia is boring?"

[vilnius] The Lithuanian government has approved the country's toughest anti-smoking laws to date. Under the laws, tobacco advertising will be restricted to sales outlets only. A new law will be introduced to stipulate criteria for in-store tobacco ads. The promotion of tobacco products will be banned outright under the Tobacco Control Act which is slated to take effect Sept. 1.

Tobacco advertising is now allowed on commercial TV, at cinemas, on billboards and in print, and accounts for 34% of advertising carried by the four commercial TV channels.

For information about Advertising Age's Daily World Wire, call Christine Yun in New York, 212-210-0789 or fax 212-210-0111.

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