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Ad Age Wake-Up Call: Facebook Watch, Lululemon For Men and Other News to Know Today

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Good morning. Welcome to Ad Age's Wake-Up Call, our daily roundup of advertising, marketing and digital-related news. What people are talking about today: Facebook's new video hub, Watch, has started rolling out to everybody in the U.S. And there's a lot to see. In a virtual reality dating show by Conde Nast Entertainment, a couple actually go dancing on the moon, in VR, while they make awkward small talk. And in a show from TheSkimm, Chelsea Handler and Hank Azaria will explain the news while lounging in their bathtubs.

Publishers are talking to advertisers about potential sponsored shows, too, as Digiday reports. In the meantime, here's a list of shows that are already out, courtesy of Variety. Did we mention there's a reality show about a baby hippo named Fiona at the Cincinnati Zoo?

Men in Lululemon
You might not be aware that Lululemon has a product for men called ABC pants – that's ABC as in "anti-ball crushing." Men are going to be a bigger priority for the activewear brand, which is about to launch its first dedicated men's marketing campaign later this month, as Ad Age's Adrianne Pasquarelli reports. The company says its men's business has momentum and is one of its best-kept secrets. The ABC pants are set to be part of they upcoming campaign, and we're curious about how they're going to market those. The company's web site explains that the trousers are "designed for mobility so the boys can breathe."

Ad fraud
Digital ad fraud is probably costing marketers billions annually, according to estimates. The Trade Desk, a demand-side platform, has a new approach to fighting it. The company has a partnership with cyber-security outfit White Ops "that, in theory, should effectively thwart bad actors from siphoning ad dollars from marketers for impressions never seen by humans," as Ad Age's George Slefo reports. The Trade Desk says it can now prevent fraud beforehand, because White Ops will scan each impression before marketers bid. Is it "game-changing," like The Trade Desk says? It will be interesting to see how P&G, a client, responds.

Dreamers
Silicon Valley leaders are lobbying President Trump not to cut a program that protects people who were brought to the U.S. illegally when they were young. The CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google and Twitter are among 300 business leaders who wrote a letter urging Trump to keep protecting the so-called Dreamers. And Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a separate post, "I stand with the Dreamers." Zuckerberg 2020?

Just briefly:

Ogilvy Shenzhen: Ogilvy & Mather is opening an office in Shenzhen, a city it calls "China's Silicon Valley." Shenzhen has undergone a remarkable transformation and rebranding; it used to be synonymous with factories churning out cheap products.

Sept. 12: Apple has confirmed that Sept. 12 is the date for its next product launch, as The Wall Street Journal reports. The event will take place at its new spaceship-like headquarters.

Media layoffs: The Village Voice is laying off 13 of its 17 union employees, The New York Times reports. On the other side of the political spectrum, conservative Glenn Beck laid off over 20% of staff at The Blaze and Mercury Radio Arts, Poynter says.

In the news: Chick-fil-A is giving away free breakfasts. Separately, it's in the news because a couple in Houston called their local Chick-fil-A during Hurricane Harvey to order "two grilled chicken burritos with extra egg, and a boat." The manager actually sent a boat to their flooded house, as ABC News reports.

Campaign of the day: In what is perhaps the most bizarrely located pop-up shop of all time, a company called 37.5 Technology opened a shop for climbers on the side of a 300-foot cliff, as Creativity Online's Alexandra Jardine reports.